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Boxing / Editorial

Boxing Briefs for Sept. 24 - R.I.P. Corrie Sanders

Corey Erdman / September 24, 2012 - 6:47pm

Sanders died protecting his daughter

We’ll start with some heartbreaking news, as more details emerge surrounding the death of former heavyweight champion Corrie Sanders.

Sanders was shot and killed at a family dinner in a restaurant in South Africa this past weekend.

According to several reports, he died trying to protect his daughter.

Per SuperSport:

While SA sport in general and boxing in particular mourned the death of the hugely popular Sanders, it has emerged that the former champion lay across his 15-year-old daughter Marinique while the robbers were shooting randomly at guests at the restaurant where they were attending a family member’s 21st birthday.

Beeld reported on Monday that Sanders, who died of a stomach wound at Kalafong hospital on Sunday morning, had whispered to Marinique to pretend she was dead.

She, and all the other youngsters at the party, escaped unharmed.

Witnesses say the robbers fled when a vehicle’s alarm went off in the car park. They took some personal belongings, mostly cellphones from the nearly 50 people at the restaurant.

The robbers carried pistols and it has been reported that 9mm cartridges were found at the scene. Sanders was the only person hit by a bullet.

Sanders will forever be remembered for his 2003 upset of Wladimir Klitschko, one of the biggest in the sport’s history.

Rest in peace, Champ.

Pacquiao claims he will accept 55-45 split with Mayweather

Well, we can pretend again that a meeting between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather is close!

On a recent appearance on ESPN’s First Take to promote his fourth bout with Juan Manuel Marquez, Pacquiao said he would accept a 55-45 split, random drug testing, and would even concede entering first and the size of the ring.

Cool.

But does Bob Arum agree with all of this?

Unfortunately, Pacquiao can’t just decide to take less money, because he is not the only beneficiary of his bouts in his team. If Mayweather were to say the same thing, as a self-promoter fighter who contracts out his duties, it would be meaningful.

So while the sentiment and the gesture are both good, don’t be tricked into thinking anything has changed or that the “ball is in Floyd’s court now.”

We’re very much in the same place that we’ve been for the past three years.

Chavez Jr. issues apology for positive marijuana test

After his team tried to explain a positive marijuana test by citing “herbal tea concoctions,” Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. just went ahead and issued an apology, which is about as close to an admission of outright guilt as you’re going to get.

Below is an excerpt from his full apology:

"I apologize to all those who are disappointed or aggrieved by my behavior," Chavez said. "I alone know the causes (for the failed drug test) and it is for me alone to confront them. In contrast, I can say that I will emerge stronger from these events and I shall endeavor to vindicate my personal image.

"Everything that happened makes this a perfect time to stop and think about the future. Now it is time for a new Julio Cesar Chavez to be born and I will begin a period in my career that will prepare me physically and mentally to achieve new goals, including, in the short term, a rematch with Sergio 'Maravilla' Martinez. I take this opportunity to thank everybody for all of the support that I have received and I also recognize all of those who have sent me messages of any kind."

The apology is a good look for Julio, and there’s really not much more to say.

It remains to be seen how much of his purse from the Martinez bout will be taken away, if any, and how long he will be suspended for in Nevada as a result of the positive test.

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